Image for representation. Credits: AP.

As the world reels from the invisible, infectious disease, there are innumerable stories covering the disease, and in the clutter, many good ones get lost.

News18.com
Last Updated: May 2, 2020, 5:11 PM IST

It’s a rare moment in history, that the entire world is hooked onto one single story: The global pandemic.

As the world reels from the invisible, infectious disease, there are innumerable stories covering the disease, and in the clutter, many good ones get lost.

A journalist at the Atlantic has compiled some of the best ones. These are the stories.

Hello! A lot of you have started following me in the last couple of months, so let me introduce you to some people I respect, who’ve created some of the pandemic writing that’s really stuck with me.

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

I keep thinking about this haunting first-person account from @DrHelenOuyang of how the pandemic swept through NY hospitals, juxtaposed against similar experiences in Lombardy. It’s an *incredible* feat of writing. https://t.co/hIJK7UlKZU

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

There are few people I would’ve trusted to do a big piece on coronavirus and climate change. @meehancrist is on the top of a short list, and she utterly delivers here. Thoughtful, sweeping, forward-looking. https://t.co/v9csSiCcNF

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

Are any reporters on the infectious disease beat more respected than @helenbranswell? I doubt it. Her interview with CDC director Robert Redfield still lingers in the mind, but just read anything she writes. https://t.co/l2x4Mrgxcs

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

.@maggiekb1 is the god of the “this ostensibly simple thing is way more complicated than you think, but let me walk you through it” explainer. Here she is on why it’s so hard to build a good COVID-19 model. https://t.co/nfz3kVQVM1

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

.@sarahzhang is one of the most formidable science writers working today. This story on the various options for creating an anti-covid drug is great, and just read all her stories on treatments and antibody testing. https://t.co/YxIb1D6OHx

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

.@lizneeley’s piece on how to talk about the coronavirus draws on her very deep knowledge of the science of science communication. It’s a north star for all the difficult conversations ahead. https://t.co/tPWzfgXAaB

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

.@zeynep is a formidable thinker and has written so many pieces that have shaped how I’ve thought about the pandemic. This one on what models mean is great; so are all the rest. https://t.co/Lsid7mdpcF

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

.@amandamull is so so good at unpacking the weird details of modern society, and zooming up and down from broad systems to everyday life. This piece on Georgia is awesome, but just always read her. https://t.co/B4rdNanBpi

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

.@amandamull is so so good at unpacking the weird details of modern society, and zooming up and down from broad systems to everyday life. This piece on Georgia is awesome, but just always read her. https://t.co/B4rdNanBpi

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

This @stephaniemlee piece on the Santa Clara serology study is a textbook example of responsibly reporting on complicated and controversial new research. Stephanie is always great, as is the entire Buzzfeed science desk. https://t.co/dJ4fN5ASqn

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

.@rkhamsi has done some great work throughout the pandemic, inc. an early and very prescient piece on false comparisons to the flu. The one below was, I think, the first major piece to tackle the “airborne” question and holds up 2 months later. https://t.co/d3AtvtUODl

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

You might not think a space reporter would easily pivot to pandemic coverage but I will tell you a truth I’ve learned over the last years: @marinakoren can (and often will!) report on *anything* and it’ll be great. https://t.co/57pJyPqLCS

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

The pandemic has also wrecked the publicity campaigns of many great books that should find their audiences, but might not. I’ve mentioned Olga Khazan’s WEIRD further up: (https://t.co/H4QLy1jrJw)
Let me recommend some others. (These aren’t pandemic-related but they ARE great.)

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

The Biggest Bluff, by @mkonnikova about life, poker, the brain, and how Maria went from writing a book about professional poker to actually becoming a professional poker player. https://t.co/R8zCQwq0oH

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

The Lady’s Handbook for Her Mysterious Illness, by @wolflarsenmusic. An astonishing memoir of Sarah’s long battle with a mysterious illness that doctors thought was all in her head. Important, heartbreaking, wise, witty. https://t.co/JWGW3u4YRR

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

Feasting Wild: In Search of the Last Untamed Food, by @GinaRaeLC (out end of this month). It’s the food book I’ve always wanted to read. A witty, illuminating, and beautifully written travelogue. https://t.co/Xr5E6IRASW

— Ed Yong (@edyong209) May 1, 2020

Next Story