A model of a coronavirus is displayed next to boxes for Covid-19 vaccines at an exhibit by Chinese pharmaceutical firm Sinopharm at the China International Fair for Trade in Services (CIFTIS) in Beijing, on September 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Another thing to favour longevity of the virus’s survival is the smoothness of a surface. Smooth surface like stainless steel and glass held onto the virus longer than rougher surface like cotton.
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Last Updated: October 12, 2020, 6:07 PM IST

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As if the existing dangers of coronavirus weren’t enough, it is now believed that the virus can survive up to a month on certain surfaces, an Australian study finds.

The study was conducted at CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency. The COVID-19 virus can exist up to 28 days on things like currency notes and mobile phone screens as well as stainless steel products. The Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness (ACDP) oversaw the research at Geelong, Victoria. They also found that the virus can survive better at colder temperatures.


Another thing to favour longevity of the virus’s survival is the smoothness of a surface. Smooth surface like stainless steel and glass held onto the virus longer than rougher surface like cotton. This finding was published on EurekAlert.

The virus had already shown the ability to remain infectious for up to three hours in airborne particles.

CSIRO research included analysis and re-isolation of the virus over a course of one month to assert the survivability rates. Previous estimates had warned that the virus could last on steel surfaces for over three days.

The disease COVID-19 is caused by SARS-CoV-2. It can last nearly ten days longer than normal influenza virus on some of the surfaces tested in the study.

The virus was tested under 30-40 degree Celsius. The researchers discovered that the chances of survival decreased as the temperature increased and vice versa. The lab condition was maintained in a state of darkness to eliminate any possible Ultra Violet light. As direct sunlight can inactivate the virus, the presence of UV light would have contaminated the study.

The results of this study were published in Virology Journal. It clearly proves that the virus is capable of surviving for much longer periods than previously considered.

“Establishing how long this virus remains viable on surfaces is critical for developing risk mitigation strategies in high contact areas,” said Dr Debbie Eagles. She is the deputy director of ACDP and is also working on possible COVID-19 vaccines at the moment.